Millennials Don’t Shop, Eat Like Earlier Generations, Reports Say

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Photo: Nutraceuticals World

It was, of course, inevitable: Millennials, like generations that preceded them, are having impacts on buying patterns in food stores. A big shift with the age group born between 1982 and 1994 – which is, according to the Urban Dictionary definition of ‘Millennials’, “something special, cause mom and dad and their 5th grade teacher, Mrs. Winotsky, told them so” – is in who’s doing the grocery shopping and what they’re buying.

More often than in the past, says a survey cited recently in Nutraceuticals World magazine, shoppers are male, and their choices are healthier ones.
The 12th iteration of Agosta Inc.’s twice-annual “The Why Behind the Buy” says, “Shoppers are shopping more consciously, and [are] willing to spend slightly more money and time in an effort to make healthy meals. With less stocking of the pantry and greater focus on cooking at home, more shoppers are prioritizing healthy, homemade meals, especially when it comes to feeding their families.”

An estimated 86% of surveyed shoppers reported eating dinner at home four or more days in the past week, with 37% eating dinner at home all seven days in the preceding week. And they’re increasingly opting for natural and organic foods as well as locally sourced products, the survey data showed.

Parents are especially thoughtful about their food choices. For example, 51% agreed with the statement: “We eat healthy foods even though they are more expensive.” Interest in local products across a range of consumer demographics is exemplified by growth in farmers markets across the U.S. According to the USDA, the number of farmers markets grew more than 350% from 1994 to 2014.

However, even as they express a preference for locally-sourced food, a sizable share of surveyed Millennials also take advantage of online shopping opportunities “to help support their busy, mobile lifestyles,” the report says. It notes that 41% of parents with kids use online grocery ordering, either for delivery or pick-up at the retailer, at least once a month, compared to 29% of total U.S. shoppers.

Some of these findings are, of course, dependent on where surveyed individuals live. For example, the small town I live in appears to have a relatively small population of Millennials – judging from my personal observations as I’m out and about and shopping and dining locally. And none of the town’s food stores – there are three: A Walmart, a Food Lion and a locally-owned smaller-than-super market – offer online food shopping opportunities.

I would venture to guess that most comparably-sized towns (pop. roughly 3,500) offer comparable shopping amenities and online food shopping opportunities – which is to say, a fraction of what you’d expect to find in an urban area or city.

That’s not meant to downplay the importance of  Agosta’s study. But it and similar research, such as was reported recently by Mintel, suggests Americans in general are taking healthier approaches to what they eat and how much they exercise. In so doing, they are encouraging both restaurants and supermarkets to focus more on fresher, healthier foods, and more produced within 50 miles or so of where they’re sold.

Local sourcing is stressed by all three of the local food markets, particularly in the produce section. And the locally-owned store is well recognized as the go-to place for top-grade meat offerings.

Citing the Agosta report, Nutraceuticals World said men, especially dads, are shopping more and having more impact on buying patterns than ever before. “Due in part to generational differences and economic factors, more U.S. males are spending time grocery shopping. Men suffered the most job losses during the recession, and data indicates that the number of stay-at-home dads continues to grow. Couple that with Millennials (and their modern perspective on hands-on parenting) now starting families of their own, and the result is dramatic shifts in the number, frequency and attitude of male grocery shoppers. These guys like to food shop.”

Millennial dads in particular, often having waited longer to get married and have children, are approaching fatherhood without the gender role norms of older generations.

“These dads are proactively engaged in child rearing and taking on more household tasks, including grocery shopping,” Acosta said. “In fact, Mintel reports that 80% of millennial dads claim primary or shared grocery shopping responsibility.” Dads typically spend more, particularly on organic products, and shop more frequently. Mintel also noted that dads are doing more of the food shopping these days, and it recommends every possible effort should be made to market to them.

 

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