Fore! Is That a Golf Ball in My Hash Browns?

mcCain Hash Browwns

Foods get recalled for an assortment of (sometimes odd) reasons – but because they may contain pieces of golf balls? CNN reported Sunday that McCains announced a recall over the weekend of several brands of hash brown potatoes because, as the company put it, “they may contain extraneous golf ball materials” – from balls (or pieces thereof) grabbed along with the spuds during the harvesting process.

It’s not uncommon for farm land to be re-purposed for other uses, but it says something – what, we’re not sure! – when a golf course’s greens are replaced by fields of brown potatoes. If, in fact, that’s what happened in this instance. Or perhaps someone was randomly firing golf balls into a potato field.

A statement on the FDA website says: “McCain Foods USA, Inc. announced today it is voluntarily recalling retail, frozen hash brown products that may be contaminated with extraneous golf ball materials, that despite our stringent supply standards may have been inadvertently harvested with potatoes used to make this product. Consumption of these products may pose a choking hazard or other physical injury to the mouth.

The impacted products include the following: Roundy’s Brand, 2 lb. Bag of Frozen Southern Style Hash Browns (UPC 001115055019) and Harris Teeter Brand, 2 lb. Bag of Frozen Southern Style Hash Browns (UPC 007203649020).

The Roundy’s products were distributed at Marianos, Metro Market, and Pick ‘n Save supermarkets in the states of Illinois and Wisconsin. The Harris Teeter products were distributed in the states of North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, District of Columbia, Delaware, Florida, Georgia and Maryland. Distribution occurred after the date of January 19, 2017. No other products under the respective brands are impacted by this recall.

The products being recalled were manufactured on January 19, 2017. The production code date is B170119 and can be found on the back of the packaging. Any product with a different production code date is not impacted by this recall.

Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.

There have been no reported injuries associated with the consumption of this product.”

 

Ube – an Asian Treat Coming to a Specialty Produce Seller Near You

ube

Something you don’t see a lot of in produce departments is … the color purple. But that could be about to change, thanks at least in part to a company that has long used purple as the “family” color: Frieda’s Specialty Produce, originally, some 40 years ago, Frieda’s Famous.

Karen Caplan, daughter of Frieda and now the company’s president and CEO, recently did an interview with And Now you Know, the produce newsletter, to discuss purple yams, AKA Ube (pronounced OO-beh). Native to the Phillipines, this tuber’s sweet taste and alluring purple hue is popular with cooks across Asia, Caplan told the newsletter’s Lauren Hillen.

One of Caplan’s missions was to distinguish Ube from the likes of Stokes Purple sweet potatoes and Okinawan purple sweet potatoes. They look similar, she noted, but each has a distinct taste and flavor. Ube’s skin is brown and bark-like, and its flesh ranges from white with purple specks, to lilac. Stokes Purple, a trademarked brand, has purple-tinted skin and violet-purple flesh. Okinawan purple sweet potatoes have beige skin and lavender-purple flesh.

Frieda’s produced a cute little minute-long film to illustrate those differences, and to point out the forms of Ube most likely to be encountered in the US, where the fresh variety is hard to find. The film notes it can be frozen, powered, as a jam, or as an extract – and any of those are mostly likely to show up in stores with highly refined specialty produce sections or those dedicated to Asian customers, who will seek it out.

 

TEXT MSSG: “Your milk is starting to spoil. Dump & replace it.”

trinity materials scientists

Jonathan Coleman (center) and materials science team members at Trinity College, Dublin. (Photo: Trinity)

 

Imagine getting a text on your phone advising you that the milk carton in your fridge is almost empty (so it’s time to order, or pick up, a new one!), or that the milk in that carton is starting to spoil. It is extremely likely that will not only be possible, but be happening before you’ve experienced too many more birthdays.

A team of materials scientists at Trinity College in Dublin have figured out how to make that happen; They just need more time to work out some critical details, Smithsonian.com reported this week. Citing a more technical report published this month in the journal Science, Smithsonian noted that the key is a first-ever 2-D transistor made of a form of graphite – a natural material “that’s dug out of the ground,” said as leader Jonathan Coleman put it. The honeycomb lattice of carbon they’re working with is has a depth of one atom, making it suitable for an “unimaginable” range of potential uses, Coleman said.

One would be that milk carton label. Others could – and likely will – include supermarket price labels that update themselves, wine bottle labels that can warn you when the bottles (and thus the wine) are being stored in too warm a location.

Perhaps best of all, the new 2-D printed electronics are cheaper than current versions, and they don’t have the same performance limitations having to do with stability and energy conversion.

If you can print electronics very cheaply, you can imagine things that are almost unimaginable,” Coleman said.

Supermarkets Are Replacing Department Stores in US Malls

philly-now-Whole-Foods-shot

As department store chains shrink, their former stores in malls have remained empty, making mall operators unhappy and customers wary of all the dark anchor spaces – those at either end of the mall, once the hustling, bustling home to this Big Name Chain or another one. What’s a mall operator to do?

Increasingly, a Philadelphia Inquirer article noted last week (April 11), supermarkets are increasingly being invited – or independently exploring opportunities – to take over spaces once occupied by J.C. Penney, Sears, Macy’s or another once-popular, now-fading national or regional department store outlet.

The malls offer several serious pluses to food sellers: [1] They have the right zoning; [2] they were designed for high traffic, and have parking lots to accommodate it, and [3] they tend to be in easy-to-get-to/from locations. (A notable exception to the latter is Virginia’s Tysons Corner area, just outside Washington, D.C. When I lived in that area 40 years ago, after a few harried visits, I wouldn’t go near the “place” – actually an accumulation of shopping centers positioned so close to each other that getting from one to another was a nightmare and avoiding the entire mess was all but impossible.

(The Tysons Center website lists more than 300 stores, including an Amazon kiosk. And that’s in just one of the shopping centers!)

In the Philadelphia area, a Whole Foods already has replaced a department store at Plymouth Meeting Mall. Another Whole Foods is due to open later in the year at Exton Square Mall, and a Wegman’s is in the works for the Montgomery Mall. The article also noted that “Jimbo’s, a specialty food chain much like Whole Foods, opened at Westfield Horton Plaza in San Diego; Wegmans is replacing a Penneys near Boston; and College Mall in Bloomington, Ind., will welcome 365 by Whole Foods Market this fall.”

Expect to see more such activity in coming months and years.

Kroger Trims Store Development Plans, Ups E-Commerce / Technology Activity

kroger-logo

Noting that its competitors are increasingly following Kroger’s store-building and stocking approaches, the nation’s 2nd largest grocer (after Walmart) said in a Securities and Exchange filing that 2017 will see fewer stores developed and more done in the areas of technology and e-commerce.

A Food Dive analysis said this past weekend that financial analysts more than likely view this move as a savvy one, demonstrating Kroger’s ability to flew with the needs of its markets. (The company operates a number of store names scattered across the country.) Food Dive noted that Kroger has been aggressively expanding its Click List e-commerce service as it works to establish itself as the go-to company for online sales across the country.

In the SEC filing, company executives noted that their first same-store sales slip in 52 quarters was due to food price deflation couple with an active development program. The company said it will be growing its footprint at a slower pace – by 1.8% compared to last year’s 3.44% – as it cuts back to 55 new projects, compared to 2016’s 85. And capital expenditures, the company said, will fall 13% to between $3.2-3.5 billion, compared to $3.7 billion in 2016.