Wegmans Feeds 1,000 C’ville Protests First Responders

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Wegmans on Dick Rd. in Cheektowaga. Photo taken, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. (Sharon Cantillon/Buffalo News)

More than 1.000 first responders dealing with the unrest in Charlottesville VA last weekend faced angry protesters – some there to oppose the city’s plan to remove from a public part a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee from a public park, others out to protesters that group – from Friday night through Sunday. Thanks to Wegman’s, the New York State-based supermarket chain presently expanding into states far further south, they didn’t do so on empty stomachs.

A car of the first responders visited a Wegman’s a couple of miles from the heart of the protest area, abutting the campus of the University of Virginia, seeking a couple of pizzas and some drinks. They got way more, when store managers and workers set aside normal tasks to go all out preparing and packing hot food, beverages and more for the first responders – and initially refused to take any money for it. (Then, the first responders said they insisted on paying, and the store reluctantly gave in.)

A Facebook posting by Metro Richmond Fire Incidents, which sent crews to Charlottesville for the event, said that “store managers halted their daily work and ‘dedicated themselves and other staff to cooking for us. They fired up all their ovens, called in extra bakers and even emptied their freezers to cook boxed pizza for us when they ran out of dough.”
The night manager stayed till 1 a.m. to oversee the effort to feed more than 1,000 police officers and National Guard members, “amid absolute chaos and with no advanced notice,” according to the Facebook post. The deed culminated Sunday morning with 500 Virginia State Police troopers “walking into their location, bereft with grief, yet so thankful to see a 20-foot long counter lined with breakfast.”

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Jo Natale, a spokesperson for Wegmans, confirmed the actions of employees confirmed the actions of employees and declined to comment further to Wegman’s hometown newspaper, the Rochester Democrat a& Chronicle, stating that the Facebook post “speaks for itself.”

Since it was initially put online, the post by the Metro Richmond Fire Incidents page was shared more than 4,000 times with more than 4,300 reactions and 300+ comments, it was reported by WHAM-TV of Rochester NY.

For Protein, Give Peas A Chance

 

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Food Dive reported last week that while alternative proteins from algae and insects continue to make headlines, until they become cheaper and more appetizing, an increasing number of manufacturers will ask us to give peas a chance.

Extracted from dried and ground yellow split peas, pea protein is showing up in everything from sports supplements, smoothies and protein bars, to meat alternatives and yogurt. General Mills uses it in its Lärabar and Cascadian Farms brands, UK bakery giant Warburton’s recently added pea protein to sliced bread, and it is even possible to buy ‘pea milk’.

Beyond Meat produces a vegetarian burger based on pea protein that looks, sizzles and even ‘bleeds’ like a beef burger, thanks to beetroot juice. Even meat firms are paying attention, as Tyson Foods — the nation’s biggest meat producer — has bought a 5% stake in the company. In meat products themselves, companies are adding pea protein to cut fat content and improve texture.

The appeal for consumers is that pea protein is a non-allergenic, non-GMO and environmentally friendly ingredient — especially when compared to other commonly used protein sources like soy and whey. While whey protein is the most popular fortification product on the market, more consumers are considering plant-based protein sources for their health and environmental benefits.

The list of health benefits for pea protein is long. It is cholesterol-free, helps with satiety and blood pressure, and lowers triglycerides and cholesterol. For elderly or ill consumers, it is more easily digested than animal-derived proteins. Major pea protein supplier Roquette has also done research that suggests it is just as effective as whey for enhancing muscle mass gain during weight training.

All of this adds up to a booming market. According to Mintel, the number of new products containing pea protein grew by 195% from 2013 to 2016.

Roquette is banking on rising demand for pea protein in a big way, and recently announced a CA$400 million ($321 million) investment to build the world’s largest pea protein factory in Manitoba, Canada, as well as an additional €40 million ($47 million) for its French pea processing site. By 2019, the company expects the two facilities to have a combined capacity of 250,000 tons a year, placing it at the heart of two of the world’s biggest regions for pea protein ingredients — North America and Europe — as well as the world’s biggest pea supply. Canada provides 30% of the global pea protein total.

Roquette has seen growing demand for protein-fortified products. Meat substitute products grow rapidly as more consumers become interested in vegetarian options.

Part of peas’ appeal is the claims food companies can make on-pack — including gluten-free, non-GMO, kosher and vegan. Unlike soy, whey or casein, pea protein is not considered to be a major allergen, meaning foods and drinks containing the ingredient can make low/no/reduced allergen claims.

Pea protein does have potential downsides, particularly when it comes to protein quality.

Soy and animal-derived proteins are considered “complete” because they contain all nine essential amino acids — those not made by the body. Protein from peas is “incomplete,” meaning it is low in certain amino acids.

While this may give some athletes pause, it is unlikely to be a problem, according to Melissa Majumdar, registered dietitian and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

As long as someone is not relying on pea protein for their only source of protein, they will likely meet their amino acid and therefore protein needs,” she told Food Dive.

If all essential amino acids are not available or are only available in limited amounts, the body must get them from another source to perform functions in the body needing protein. In other words, amino acids are the protein puzzle pieces and the puzzle is not complete with a missing piece.”

She explained that pea protein bioavailability is at 69%. Whey is 99% and soy is 95% to 98%. Apart from its limiting amino acids, bioavailability also is affected by chemicals that inhibit nutritional availability, including tannins and lectin.

On the other hand, pea protein can be a less expensive form of protein than animal protein,” Majumdar said. “Pea protein is not as common of an allergy as whey and soy and as long as the limiting acids are replaced or complemented, pea protein can be a quality protein source.”

 

Banana Delivery in NYC: It’s Seriously Complicated

Bananas

The New York Times had a fascinating feature last Friday (August 4) detailing the complications in getting bananas from their US point of entry into stores and fruit stands around New York City. Some 20 million bananas – and that doesn’t count the growing number being processed by supermarket companies – weekly.

The facts, figures and curious asides in this article include the fact that bananas are slightly radioactive. There’s also an explanation of how the ‘slip on a banana peel’ story got started, and another about the day it rained bananas in Pittsburgh.

Then there was the lady who repeatedly slipped on banana peels in a 17-long string of slip-and-fall accidents between 1906 and 1910. Eventually, she was charged with grand larceny, growing out of an investigation of her unapeeling (sic) accidents.

The Times on November 27, 1910, reported Mrs. Anna H. Sturla was due the next day in court, but the result of her hearing there wasn’t included in last week’s banana story. (And a search of the NYT archives found no later mention of her.)

The story did note that, at some point in the probably-near future, New Yorkers – like people elsewhere – are going to have to get used to a new type of banana. The Cavendish, the most commonly variety exported from Ecuador and other banana-growing countries (few of them, in fact, ‘banana republics’), is subject to being attacked and eventually defeated by a new strain of the Panama Disease, a type of Fusarium Wilt, a fungal disease that kills the plants it invades.

Scientists are trying to find or clone – as the Cavendish is a clone – that can resist that disease. But as banana historian Dan Koeppel told The Times, the Cavendish, like the Gros Michel (Big Mike) before it, have commercial advantages because around the world they are genetically identical, but “when one gets sick, they all get sick.”

In Asia, they’re trying to breed a Panama disease-resistant Cavendish. But, Mr. Koppel said, “You can’t just breed in resistance. You might be breeding out other stuff, like flavor.”

Collectively, The Times article of last week and the links we’ve provided will pretty much guarantee you’ll never again look at bananas quite the same way!

Please check out Doug Harris’s other blog, YouSayWHAT.info.