All posts by javava2012

Wegmans Feeds 1,000 C’ville Protests First Responders

features Gusto Web Wegmans Cantillon
Wegmans on Dick Rd. in Cheektowaga. Photo taken, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. (Sharon Cantillon/Buffalo News)

More than 1.000 first responders dealing with the unrest in Charlottesville VA last weekend faced angry protesters – some there to oppose the city’s plan to remove from a public part a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee from a public park, others out to protesters that group – from Friday night through Sunday. Thanks to Wegman’s, the New York State-based supermarket chain presently expanding into states far further south, they didn’t do so on empty stomachs.

A car of the first responders visited a Wegman’s a couple of miles from the heart of the protest area, abutting the campus of the University of Virginia, seeking a couple of pizzas and some drinks. They got way more, when store managers and workers set aside normal tasks to go all out preparing and packing hot food, beverages and more for the first responders – and initially refused to take any money for it. (Then, the first responders said they insisted on paying, and the store reluctantly gave in.)

A Facebook posting by Metro Richmond Fire Incidents, which sent crews to Charlottesville for the event, said that “store managers halted their daily work and ‘dedicated themselves and other staff to cooking for us. They fired up all their ovens, called in extra bakers and even emptied their freezers to cook boxed pizza for us when they ran out of dough.”
The night manager stayed till 1 a.m. to oversee the effort to feed more than 1,000 police officers and National Guard members, “amid absolute chaos and with no advanced notice,” according to the Facebook post. The deed culminated Sunday morning with 500 Virginia State Police troopers “walking into their location, bereft with grief, yet so thankful to see a 20-foot long counter lined with breakfast.”

robert wegman

Jo Natale, a spokesperson for Wegmans, confirmed the actions of employees confirmed the actions of employees and declined to comment further to Wegman’s hometown newspaper, the Rochester Democrat a& Chronicle, stating that the Facebook post “speaks for itself.”

Since it was initially put online, the post by the Metro Richmond Fire Incidents page was shared more than 4,000 times with more than 4,300 reactions and 300+ comments, it was reported by WHAM-TV of Rochester NY.

For Protein, Give Peas A Chance

 

Yellow-peas-from-Ukraine

Food Dive reported last week that while alternative proteins from algae and insects continue to make headlines, until they become cheaper and more appetizing, an increasing number of manufacturers will ask us to give peas a chance.

Extracted from dried and ground yellow split peas, pea protein is showing up in everything from sports supplements, smoothies and protein bars, to meat alternatives and yogurt. General Mills uses it in its Lärabar and Cascadian Farms brands, UK bakery giant Warburton’s recently added pea protein to sliced bread, and it is even possible to buy ‘pea milk’.

Beyond Meat produces a vegetarian burger based on pea protein that looks, sizzles and even ‘bleeds’ like a beef burger, thanks to beetroot juice. Even meat firms are paying attention, as Tyson Foods — the nation’s biggest meat producer — has bought a 5% stake in the company. In meat products themselves, companies are adding pea protein to cut fat content and improve texture.

The appeal for consumers is that pea protein is a non-allergenic, non-GMO and environmentally friendly ingredient — especially when compared to other commonly used protein sources like soy and whey. While whey protein is the most popular fortification product on the market, more consumers are considering plant-based protein sources for their health and environmental benefits.

The list of health benefits for pea protein is long. It is cholesterol-free, helps with satiety and blood pressure, and lowers triglycerides and cholesterol. For elderly or ill consumers, it is more easily digested than animal-derived proteins. Major pea protein supplier Roquette has also done research that suggests it is just as effective as whey for enhancing muscle mass gain during weight training.

All of this adds up to a booming market. According to Mintel, the number of new products containing pea protein grew by 195% from 2013 to 2016.

Roquette is banking on rising demand for pea protein in a big way, and recently announced a CA$400 million ($321 million) investment to build the world’s largest pea protein factory in Manitoba, Canada, as well as an additional €40 million ($47 million) for its French pea processing site. By 2019, the company expects the two facilities to have a combined capacity of 250,000 tons a year, placing it at the heart of two of the world’s biggest regions for pea protein ingredients — North America and Europe — as well as the world’s biggest pea supply. Canada provides 30% of the global pea protein total.

Roquette has seen growing demand for protein-fortified products. Meat substitute products grow rapidly as more consumers become interested in vegetarian options.

Part of peas’ appeal is the claims food companies can make on-pack — including gluten-free, non-GMO, kosher and vegan. Unlike soy, whey or casein, pea protein is not considered to be a major allergen, meaning foods and drinks containing the ingredient can make low/no/reduced allergen claims.

Pea protein does have potential downsides, particularly when it comes to protein quality.

Soy and animal-derived proteins are considered “complete” because they contain all nine essential amino acids — those not made by the body. Protein from peas is “incomplete,” meaning it is low in certain amino acids.

While this may give some athletes pause, it is unlikely to be a problem, according to Melissa Majumdar, registered dietitian and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

As long as someone is not relying on pea protein for their only source of protein, they will likely meet their amino acid and therefore protein needs,” she told Food Dive.

If all essential amino acids are not available or are only available in limited amounts, the body must get them from another source to perform functions in the body needing protein. In other words, amino acids are the protein puzzle pieces and the puzzle is not complete with a missing piece.”

She explained that pea protein bioavailability is at 69%. Whey is 99% and soy is 95% to 98%. Apart from its limiting amino acids, bioavailability also is affected by chemicals that inhibit nutritional availability, including tannins and lectin.

On the other hand, pea protein can be a less expensive form of protein than animal protein,” Majumdar said. “Pea protein is not as common of an allergy as whey and soy and as long as the limiting acids are replaced or complemented, pea protein can be a quality protein source.”

 

Banana Delivery in NYC: It’s Seriously Complicated

Bananas

The New York Times had a fascinating feature last Friday (August 4) detailing the complications in getting bananas from their US point of entry into stores and fruit stands around New York City. Some 20 million bananas – and that doesn’t count the growing number being processed by supermarket companies – weekly.

The facts, figures and curious asides in this article include the fact that bananas are slightly radioactive. There’s also an explanation of how the ‘slip on a banana peel’ story got started, and another about the day it rained bananas in Pittsburgh.

Then there was the lady who repeatedly slipped on banana peels in a 17-long string of slip-and-fall accidents between 1906 and 1910. Eventually, she was charged with grand larceny, growing out of an investigation of her unapeeling (sic) accidents.

The Times on November 27, 1910, reported Mrs. Anna H. Sturla was due the next day in court, but the result of her hearing there wasn’t included in last week’s banana story. (And a search of the NYT archives found no later mention of her.)

The story did note that, at some point in the probably-near future, New Yorkers – like people elsewhere – are going to have to get used to a new type of banana. The Cavendish, the most commonly variety exported from Ecuador and other banana-growing countries (few of them, in fact, ‘banana republics’), is subject to being attacked and eventually defeated by a new strain of the Panama Disease, a type of Fusarium Wilt, a fungal disease that kills the plants it invades.

Scientists are trying to find or clone – as the Cavendish is a clone – that can resist that disease. But as banana historian Dan Koeppel told The Times, the Cavendish, like the Gros Michel (Big Mike) before it, have commercial advantages because around the world they are genetically identical, but “when one gets sick, they all get sick.”

In Asia, they’re trying to breed a Panama disease-resistant Cavendish. But, Mr. Koppel said, “You can’t just breed in resistance. You might be breeding out other stuff, like flavor.”

Collectively, The Times article of last week and the links we’ve provided will pretty much guarantee you’ll never again look at bananas quite the same way!

Please check out Doug Harris’s other blog, YouSayWHAT.info.

Gambling Machines Among Latest ‘Added Values’ Items In US Supermarkets

video gambling machines

Generally speaking, grocers aren’t gamblers: Traditionally, they’ve tended to hew to fairly traditional approaches to marketing and selling food. At least they did until a few years ago.

Then, faced with new competitor types – such as hard discounters such as Aldi and Sav-A-Lot (and now, Lidl) – and an increasing emphasis on store periphery departments, retailers started stepping up their game, expanding their offerings and, most recently, paring prices to the bone.

A growing number, including New York State-based Wegman’s, and Connecticut-based Stew Leonard’s, added an entertainment factor by bringing ‘backroom’ business to the store floor: Putting in-store baking operations front-and-center; providing a window into juice- and milk-bottling operations (Stew Leonard was a pioneer in this); taking sampling to a new level with educated offerings of featured wines … the list goes on.

But following at least two other Illinois grocers in truly breaking new ground recently was a Piggly Wiggly store in Antioch, where several video gambling machines were introduced. Store owner David Karczewski told the local Daily Herald newspaper that while the machines hadn’t been part of his original plan when he applied for a license to sell alcohol within his store, he quickly realized that the liquor permit, which also allowed him to introduce video gambling into his grocery store, sounded like a good idea.

He’s subsequently said he’s been proved right: He told the Daily Herald that they’ve earned him a number of new customers.

Hardly surprisingly, some community members have objected to the presence of gambling machines in a family-focused establishment, while town board members say allowing gambling wasn’t their intention in approving the store’s liquor license. Store owner Karczewski, meanwhile, said he installed the machines to give his location a competitive edge against larger competitors, and he’s been pleased with the many new shoppers he’s seen in the store.

His innovation, Food Dive noted a few days ago, isn’t all that different from other food retailers’ innovative efforts to attract new customers, or, at the least, new income from existing ones. (Banking, parcel shipping, Coinstar machines and even the occasional Department of Motor Vehicles branch as well as restaurants and bars being among them.)

In all such instances, retailers are fighting as best they can to overcome competitive threats. Even more extreme, though, are the approaches of such disrupters as Lidl and Aldi, in particular, whose strategies revolve around limiting selections (reducing the need for backroom space) and cutting costs – internally and to consumers – to the bone.

The latter’s strategy is disrupting the food retailing industry more dramatically than anything before it came close to doing. The club stores – Costo, Sam’s Club – caused a lot of shoppers to rethink shopping patterns a couple decades ago, but the careful among them quickly realized that the key to successfully shopping those stores – to save money – is to ‘pre-shop’ prices of things you want at other outlets. The clubs aren’t giving anything away, so some of their prices are far from the best out there.

And that concept was further complicated as Amazon introduced an ever-broader range of products online. Now, the click-and-collect concept that Walmart, among others, are greatly promoting are presenting further challenges to walk-in-and-buy oriented retailers.

It’s only a matter of time before Walmart and others figure out how to profitably do click-and-collect on food items. Fresh and frozen food items, that is: Offering click-and-collect on dry groceries is as simple as doing it.

Meanwhile, dollar stores also are becoming more competitive against grocers. Dollar Tree, for example, has been featuring – via a big store-front banner – a several-ounce ‘pre-conditioned’ steak for around $4.00. But this is a real ‘buyer beware’ item: The product looks good, but the ‘pre-conditioning’ has involved a form of pounding that’s beat the … flavor out of the product.

Still, to some shoppers, something called a ‘steak’ is still outside the range of what they usually consume for protein. And that’s the key issue on all the retail changes the industry is undergoing: The value is in the eyes of the beholders, and consumers, having an amazing assortment of tastes and concepts of what’s good, and good for them, will respond to grocers’ changes with their own ideas of what makes sense and what doesn’t.

Watch this space!

Walmart Adding 500 Direct, 250 Indirect Jobs At New $36M Distribution Center in Mexico

walmart_distribution_yucatan

Walmart’s current distribution centers in Mexico.

Walmart plans to invest $36 M (650 million pesos) on a new distribution center in Yucatan, Mexico. The center will be operated by the company’s Mexico and Central America division and bring total Walmart investment in that area to $171.5 million (3.138 billion pesos) and generate more than 500 direct jobs and 250 indirect ones, the company has announced.

A statement published on July 4 on the website of Yucatan Times said, the new business unit will positively impact [Yucatan’s] production infrastructure, since in addition to the new jobs, it will expand the company supply network into the states of Campecha and Quintana Roo. The activity is also expected to attract more local suppliers.

The Times said that Walmart Mexico and Central America currently has 36 business units in Yucatan; 10 Bodega Aurrera stores, 11 “Mi Bodegas Aurrera”, five “Bodegas Aurrera Express”, three Sam’s Club, one Superama, and six Walmarts. The company has said that Walmart México and Central America has generated 3,457 permanent jobs in 14 municipalities of the state: Mérida, Halacho, Hunucma, Izamal, Motul, Kanasin, Oxkutzcab, Tekax, Tixkokob, Tizimín, Ticul, Uman, Valladolid and Progreso.

AndNowYouKnow, the produce industry blog, noted that the new facility will allow the company to strengthen and expand its logistics network in Mexico.

What neither The Times nor ANYK said was whether the distribution center – with new suppliers on board – might in time facilitate an increased flow of Mexican produce into the United States. This would be a logical secondary use for the center, nopt least because that would enable trucks delivering from Walmart US to Walmart Mexico to avoid making the return trip empty. One has to assume that someone in Bentonville AR, Walmart’s global headquarters, has calculated both the logistics and the practicality of employing that potential.

 

What’s In A Name? Trouble, Where “Fructose” Is Concerned

fructose_artThe following information is not confirmed, as of June 5, 2017, on an FDA website. The information below was provided by a company that offers nutritional supplements. Take the advice with a grain of salt – but no more than that, because excess salt is as serious a problem as is too much sugar!

I’m just writing to tip you off that the FDA is currently allowing food manufacturers to rename high-fructose corn syrup on ingredient labels.
And the big food companies are THRILLED about this. After all, this toxic ingredient has taken a beating in the press lately for being so unhealthy.
In fact, it got to the point where having high-fructose corn syrup” on ingredient lists was hurting sales.
That’s why the powerful food industry pushed for a new name… and as usual, they got their way.
The new name is simply “fructose” or “fructose syrup.”
Now, if you’ve read my blog on sugar, you already know fructose is one of the most dangerous things for your body. It skyrockets your risk for diabetes, heart disease, and liver disease.
And yet… food manufacturers put it in nearly everything. After all, it’s sweet and addictive — and it makes you eat more of their food.
Most people don’t know this, though. They know high-fructose corn syrup is bad. And some even know sugar is bad, too. But they don’t know it’s all because of the fructose.
And this name change is tricking many people into thinking dangerous, body-damaging food is okay.
That’s why I want you to be on the lookout for your enemy’s new name on ingredient labels:
The new name for high-fructose corn syrup is simply “fructose” or “fructose syrup.”
Make sure to spread the word to your friends and family, too.

Yes, do that. And for your own good, become a serious label reader, particularly if you are diabetic or, like me, a chronic kidney disease (CKD) sufferer. If you are dietarily sensitive to salt, potassium or something else, get religious about controlling your intake. It’s not hard to do, if you’re careful.

 

Delivery Services, Smaller Stores, Point to Future of Food Retailing in America

we-deliver_sign

Grocery retailers who’d like to get into the home delivery game, a business so far dominated by such big players as Amazon, Instacart, Jet, Peapod and the like, are being offered an opportunity to “play” – in a very serious way – by Deliv, a crowd sourced startup that earlier this year got a $28 million cash infusion from UPS, undoubtedly the most experienced last-mile (from wherever to the customer’s door) delivery service in the US. Just-launched Deliv Fresh claims it can “offer same-day delivery from {retailers’] own branded sites,” according to an article in DC Velocity, which describes itself as “the market leading multi-media magazine brand serving the specific informational needs of logistics and supply chain managers and executives.”

Deliv says that while Amazon Prime “takes ownership of the customer transaction,” moving products from its own or partners’ warehouses direct to customers, the Deliv service “provides same-day service to grocers, meal services, and other perishable e-commerce providers such as FoodKick by FreshDirect, GetFedNYC, GreenBlender, Plated, BloomThat, The Cheese Store of Silverlake, Plum Market, and Eataly Chicago.” The company currently operates its core service in 18 markets and more than 100 cities, providing same-day, last mile delivery services for retailers and businesses including Macy’s, Best Buy, Kohl’s, and PetSmart.

Smart: They’re starting with a broad range of retailers, in a limited number or markets, testing the market, as it were, and preparing to roll out its service as and when appropriate.

The grocery retailing business is undergoing seismic changes these days, and will continue to do so as the likes of Aldi and upstart Lytl – like Aldi, a huge success as low-price-leader food stores in Europe – gain ground in the US. (Aldi’s been here for a long time, but has, for the most part, flown under the radar, since stores are, in a sense, struggling to get their low-price message out into their various communities.)

A surprisingly long article in the May 16 New York Times went well beyond reviewing a new book on the state of supermarket retailing (“Grocery – The Buying and Selling of Food in America”). The paper’s reporter went with book author Michael Ruhlman on a tour of a ShopRite store in New Jersey, getting an up-close-and-personal education on some of what’s happening in supermarkets today and, as or more important, what’s likely to happen in coming years.

One interesting point was that grocery deliveries will help influence an emerging trend – of stores getting smaller, and going back to being more customer-centric and less packed out with packaged goods of the type people are increasingly buying less of.

This is a topic you will see discussed more and more often on this blog. We also will talk more about what Aldi and Lydl are all about, and how they are likely to be big players – in way smaller stores than today’s typical ones – in the reshaping of American food retailing.

Watch this space.