Category Archives: Deliveries

Delivery Services, Smaller Stores, Point to Future of Food Retailing in America

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Grocery retailers who’d like to get into the home delivery game, a business so far dominated by such big players as Amazon, Instacart, Jet, Peapod and the like, are being offered an opportunity to “play” – in a very serious way – by Deliv, a crowd sourced startup that earlier this year got a $28 million cash infusion from UPS, undoubtedly the most experienced last-mile (from wherever to the customer’s door) delivery service in the US. Just-launched Deliv Fresh claims it can “offer same-day delivery from {retailers’] own branded sites,” according to an article in DC Velocity, which describes itself as “the market leading multi-media magazine brand serving the specific informational needs of logistics and supply chain managers and executives.”

Deliv says that while Amazon Prime “takes ownership of the customer transaction,” moving products from its own or partners’ warehouses direct to customers, the Deliv service “provides same-day service to grocers, meal services, and other perishable e-commerce providers such as FoodKick by FreshDirect, GetFedNYC, GreenBlender, Plated, BloomThat, The Cheese Store of Silverlake, Plum Market, and Eataly Chicago.” The company currently operates its core service in 18 markets and more than 100 cities, providing same-day, last mile delivery services for retailers and businesses including Macy’s, Best Buy, Kohl’s, and PetSmart.

Smart: They’re starting with a broad range of retailers, in a limited number or markets, testing the market, as it were, and preparing to roll out its service as and when appropriate.

The grocery retailing business is undergoing seismic changes these days, and will continue to do so as the likes of Aldi and upstart Lytl – like Aldi, a huge success as low-price-leader food stores in Europe – gain ground in the US. (Aldi’s been here for a long time, but has, for the most part, flown under the radar, since stores are, in a sense, struggling to get their low-price message out into their various communities.)

A surprisingly long article in the May 16 New York Times went well beyond reviewing a new book on the state of supermarket retailing (“Grocery – The Buying and Selling of Food in America”). The paper’s reporter went with book author Michael Ruhlman on a tour of a ShopRite store in New Jersey, getting an up-close-and-personal education on some of what’s happening in supermarkets today and, as or more important, what’s likely to happen in coming years.

One interesting point was that grocery deliveries will help influence an emerging trend – of stores getting smaller, and going back to being more customer-centric and less packed out with packaged goods of the type people are increasingly buying less of.

This is a topic you will see discussed more and more often on this blog. We also will talk more about what Aldi and Lydl are all about, and how they are likely to be big players – in way smaller stores than today’s typical ones – in the reshaping of American food retailing.

Watch this space.

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Cutting Produce Waste Gains Fans, At Farm and Store Levels

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There is a growing movement to reduce wastage of pre-store and store-level waste of produce that is just past its prime.

Perhaps the leader in the pre-store sector of the movement is Imperfect Produce, which sources from farms and delivers to householders through the San Francisco Bay area and, increasingly, in and around Los Angeles. Whole Foods Market introduced a program a year ago to sell “cosmetically challenged” fruits and vegetables that, despite Iooking less than perfect, are as fit for the table, lunchbox or ingredients-prepping table as their better-looking counterparts. In March of this year, Maine-based Hannaford Brothers   joined the increasing number of retailers who are offering, at discounted prices, what Hannaford calls “The Misfits – Beautifully delicious and Nutritious” but slightly over-ripe or less-than-ideally-shaped produce items.

Now, Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health has come out with a detailed primer advising shoppers and would-be eaters ways to make it more likely they will waste less of produce they buy with the best of intentions – to prepare/eat it in a timely fashion – and then don’t do so.

Whole Foods and Hannaford, no doubt like others, pull ‘misfit” produce from their own stock. Imperfect works with an assortment of farms, many of them family operated, around California. They buy what’s in season but a little “off,” cosmetically.’

Their website says, “The produce we source is rejected purely for cosmetic reasons, meaning that taste and nutrition aren’t affected. Common reasons for produce being classified as “ugly” are: too small, wrong color, misshapen. We only source the most delicious fruits and vegetables, and we have strict quality-control measures in place to ensure that what ends up on your doorstep is fresh, delicious, and nutritious. If we wouldn’t eat it, we won’t sell it. We’re redefining BEAUTY in produce, not taste!” They also have a “like it or don’t pay for it” policy in the event a client feels something in their weekly box – the program works on a subscription basis, with boxes of pre-selected sizes and mixes being delivered weekly – is too ugly, they get credit for it in their next shipment.

It is likely more such programs will be initiated in coming years, and well they should be, Anything to reduce the amount of produce being wasted is a good thing!

‘Bad Eggs’ Caught Smuggling West Bank Hen Fruit into Israel

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(photo credit: Nati Shochat/Flash 90)

A 21-year-old Palestinian was caught earlier this month trying to smuggle some 9,000 uninspected, potentially dangerous eggs into Jerusalem from the West Bank. The Times of Israel reported, quoting Hebrew news sources, that the eggs were confiscated and destroyed by Israel’s Ministry of Health.

The eggs were said to be on their way to be sold in various Israeli retail outlets.

The Times reported last July that charges were “laid against a ring of [14] bad eggs accused of selling, well, bad eggs to the public and passing them off as certified.” Thirteen Israelis and one Palestinian were said to be involved in that ring, which was charged with illegally importing more than 10 million eggs into Israel.

It’s more than likely that, at some point during their court appearance, the Israeli smugglers were told, “That wasn’t kosher.”

McDonald’s To Test Delivering Via UberEats

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McDonald’s is planning to test deliveries via UberEats in three Florida markets starting in late January, The Chicago Tribune reported a few days ago.

Though a person close to plan said the deal linking McDonald’s and UberEats hadn’t been signed asa of last week, The Trib said McDolnald’s has said that it is intended to include some 200 restaurants in the Orlando, Tampa, and Miami markets.  The paper said UberEats lets customers order online or through its app, anda an Uber “Courier” deliveries the food.

In the case of McDonald’s – which already delivers through such third-party companies as DoorDash and Postmates – the Uber fee is said to be set at $5, lower than the delivery and service fees of the other delivery service McDonald’s is using.

McDonald’s also is planning to roll out a mobile order and pay service next  year, and it is spending considerable sums upgrading its restaurants and introducing kiosk ordering systems and bluetooth-enabled table service.

The Trib article noted that the world’s largest burger chain presently does two-thirds of its business via drive-thrus, and several tweeks have been introduced to them to speed up service to drivers.mcdonalds_sign