Category Archives: Fish-selling

A Review: Mobile AL Restaurant Demos Customer Service As It Should Be

g

 

felixs-2

Sadly, this is not a trend: A restaurant where team members actually work as a team, sharing responsibilities for getting dishes to tables, making customers feel important, helping, quietly, without seeming to do anything out of the ordinary, to see tables are promptly cleared and that, overall, the ebb and flow of a meal period flows without incident; with customers none the wiser that they are enjoying an unusually superb example of what good customer service is supposed to be about.

We witnessed that on Friday, March 10, at Felix’s Fish Camp, an outstanding seafood-dispensing establishment in Mobile AL. Having driven there from New Orleans, a couple of hours and a bit away, we arrived somewhat later than planned. We were promised we’d be seated in five minutes. It took less than four for our ‘caller device’ to vibrate, and our adventure was underway.

Courtney seated us, at close to 1 pm., at a table with clear views from both seats (I had to turn a bit to take in the totality of the view over the Gulf of Mexico shallows, with shore birds busily securing feasts of their own; My wife with had the entire panorama laid out before her.) If you’re fortunate, you might also see alligators moving about or nesting in the shore side reeds and grasses.

Drinks were ordered (a glass of pino grigio for me, a ‘fancy’, foamy concoction for her) , then orders were taken – a cup of crab soup for me, followed by the been-waiting-all-week-for boiled jumbo Gulf shrimp; a taco specialty for her.

Already, I was looking around, observing, having been attracted by a parade of servers heading for a table just beyond us. Fully coordinated, smooth as you’d wish, food-to-table service. I watched this display of in-snych service several times, as a silent row of servers slid between tables toward their destination then, as quietly and unobtrusively, slip away.

felix-s_fish_camp==art

I happened to be facing the dining room entrance, and was intrigued to note a staging area set up just beyond that entrance way. Orders were delivered from the kitchen to a large table there, to be dispensed to servers close to their stations, and well away from the kitchen itself, where their presence, as is often the case in commercial kitchens, is something to be endured by cooks and their assistants, but only grudgingly tolerated. The staging station eliminates that issue, helping back-of-the-house operations run smoother, with fewer distractions.

The staging station also enables the multi-server food-to-table operation so successfully employed by Felix’s. This system also reduces the apparent to-ing-and-fro-ing of wait staff, trimming – both apparently and in fact – traffic in the dining room, and enhancing, in the process, clients’ dining experience.

This was, you’ll recall, a Friday afternoon in early March – a March when, in fact, spring sprung early, and the leaves were out and the temps were up (into the upper ’60’s). Still, it was a weekday.

When a restaurant, even one so ideally positioned as this one, with a local reputation beyond repute, keeps turning lunch-period tables well beyond 2 pm, maintaining a near-full dining room at a time when most competitors’ kitchen staff are on break and the wait staff count is shrinking, you know the place is doing something right.

Peeling and consuming fresh-boiled shrimp is a messy business. By the time I (willingly) fought my way to the end of my very generous portion, my large cloth napkin was a mess, as were my hands. Two soapy hand-washes later, I’d largely dealt with the messy hands issue. Meanwhile, Courtney had dealt with the messy napkin one by providing, where my shrimp-shell bowl so recently sat, a fresh one.

But though we had to decline dessert, Felix’s wasn’t through with us.

While our arrival hadn’t been at a terribly busy time, there was a more or less steady flow of people presenting to the hostess station. I’m guessing she dealt with no fewer than 50 people between the time we entered and the time we departed. Yet, somehow, she was able to greet my wife by name as we did so! A crowning touch on a royal experience.

The restaurant’s website gives no indication of how long Felix’s Fish Camp has been in business. It’s undoubtedly been in place for many decades. But it doesn’t take those factors for granted, nor does in treat lightly the fact that its generations-spanning clientele was (and still is being) acquired one customer at a time.

The reviews on the website say it all – or almost all: To them, though, I add: Despite living nearly 800 miles from Mobile and Felix’s, I’d seriously consider taking a Thursday-to-Tuesday break to twice endure a long road trip just to enjoy the food and the atmosphere there.

Advertisements

It’s Settled: The UK’s Best Chippy Is Kingfisher’s Fish & Chips in Devon

kingfisher-fish-chipsjpg

Photo: National Fish and Chip Awards

After seven months of magnifying-glass scrutiny of everything from the fish and chips themselves to responsible sourcing practices, the observations of mystery shoppers, and more, the Kingfisher Fish and Chips shop in Devon has captured top honors at the UK’s National Fish & Chip Awards this week in London.

The judges said the overall enthusiasm of the owners, identified simply as Craig (Maw) and his “partner,” Nikki was a important factor in the decision to declare, as The Mirror newspaper put it, that they had “battered” their competition. It didn’t hurt that, beyond their menu staple (a number of species of them!), they offer whole lobster (at £15), chicken wings, racks of ribs, burgers, and a range of “barista” coffees.

The item photos on their web site make you want to hop on whatever mode of transport you need to get there and… go!

By the way, there’s a video link in the Mirror story recounting the history of fish and chips. It’s a couple of minutes long, and well worth your time.

‘Patient Sandwiches’ Earn ‘Curious’ Tweet in UK

patient sandwich package

With the best of intentions, a hospital in Northwest England posted a notice recently that “patient sandwiches” had become available. Shortly thereafter, a clever Tweeter declared, “I always wondered what they did with the left over body parts after surgery.”

Hardly surprisingly, the tweet went viral.

The Bolton News, under a headline reading ‘hospital food goes from bad to worse with ‘Patient Sandwiches’ now being served’, said the notice announcing the new food offering “suggests that patients should have major concerns about what is in hospital food. After all, hospital grub already had a bad reputation before the tweet revealed that ‘Patient Sandwiches’ are now being served.”

The tongue in cheek tweet, written by a patient at a Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh NHS Foundation Trust hospital has had around 800 likes and been retweeted more than 380 times.

All else aside, this incident stresses the fact that what one says may, at times, be only somewhat as important as how they say it.

I’m reminded of the old advertising exec’s advice to the man opening a retail fish store. He’d prepared a sign saying “Fresh Fish Today.” The ad exec said it was too wordy. “Does anyone,” he asked, “want to buy fish that aren’t fresh? Eliminate that word. And,” the exec added, “isn’t it fair to say that a potential customer walking into your shop has every reason to expect the fish you are selling today are fresh? Eliminate the word ‘today’.” In the end, the sign read simply “Fish.”

Similarly, the hospital’s announcement of an addition to its menu for patients – not a new addition, as there’s no such thing as an ‘old’ addition – kind of overshot its mark when it said ‘patient sandwiches,’ as patients were, in fact, clearly the intended beneficiaries of this menu adjustment. Would it not, therefore, been enough to note that ‘sandwiches’ had been added to the menu? (Not the menu choices, as a menu is, by definition, a list of things one can choose amongst or between – depending whether its an English menu or an American one!)