Category Archives: Healthy Eating

Cut the Cocoa, Add Jackfruit Flour, Result: Pretty Much the Same

jackfruit-growing

The bad news: Persistently low and volatile prices are raising fears that world demand for cocoa, the principal ingredient in the much-loved confectionery known as chocolate, could soon exceed availability. Aside from something called swollen shoot virus disease, the problem is, given the money, solvable: A shortage of warehouse storage capacity in the major cocao productions of West Africa, South America and Asia could relatively easily be overcome by, duh, building more facilities. But the funds to do so are lacking, so the risk of shortages is a real one.

The good news: Researchers in the UK and Brazil have found people identify a chocolate-like aroma in flour made from roasted jackfruit seeds, according to Food Navigator. Their studies hold promise for jackfruit’s ability to mimic the aroma of chocolate, making jackfruit, which has many of the same characteristics as cocoa, a potential stand-in for the real thing, providing consumers a taste and feel they like like in chocolate-like products.

The even better news: A study at the University of Malaysia has found that substituting a proportion of jackfruit flour for wheat flour in cake-making can result in a caloric reduction of more than 30% in the end product.

Food Dive reports that, “The International Cocoa Organization said about 4.7 million tons of cocoa are currently being produced worldwide, with total production expected to rise about 18% from 2016.

It’s still early as far as the jackfruit being used as a substitute for cocoa. Even if the fruit has many of the same characteristics as cocoa, if it does not mirror the taste or texture, it could instantly turn off consumers. It’s also uncertain how well the flour made from roasted jackfruit seeds would work with other ingredients used to make chocolate, or how much it would cost to produce the cocoa-like substitute. Figuring out these answers will go a long way toward determining whether it can displace cocoa in even a small amount of foods.

Developing additional U.S. markets for the popular jackfruit — now used in ice cream, smoothies, soups and side dishes — could stimulate new income streams, along with adding value and reducing widespread waste in places where it grows.

Jackfruit is the world’s largest tree-borne fruit, capable of reaching sizes of more than 80 pounds, growing both on branches and the trunks of trees native to South and East Asia. It’s botanically related to figs, mulberries and breadfruit.

It also has a dual identity. If it’s left to ripen, it becomes amazingly fruity and has been rumored to be the inspiration for the flavor of Juicy Fruit gum.

The fruit is increasingly popular with U.S. consumers. Pinterest named jackfruit as the top food item people will be trying in 2017 based on a 420% increase in interest among users of the social media platform. Vegetarians and vegans are driving some of this interest because of jackfruit’s evolving role as a meat substitute, despite its relative lack of protein.

Jackfruit delivers a powerful nutritional package as a significant source of vitamin A, C and the B-complex vitamins, dietary fiber and several important minerals, particularly potassium, magnesium, manganese and iron. Among its other assets, jackfruit contains no cholesterol and virtually no fat.

Please check out our other blog, YouSawWHAT.info.

(Between them, these blogs have been view in 90 countries!)

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Oprah Launching Sides/Soups Range

oprah_foods--01

Well, why not? She’s done pretty close to everything else. Now Oprah Winfrey is sponsoring a food line under her name. She recently filed for a trademark for her “O, That’s Good!” line of refrigerated side dishes and soups being prepared in collaboration with Kraft Heinz. Announced recently, the line is due to hit stores in October.

As The Daily Meal put it, “It only makes sense that the queen of living well would have an “Aha!” moment and come out with perfectly portioned side dishes and soups, all under 300 calories, that feed your cravings while also feeding your health.

The four sides are recognizable favorites but with discreet healthy twists: The mashed potatoes and garlic mashed potatoes are actually partially made with cauliflower, while the three cheese pasta incorporates butternut squash and the creamy parmesan pasta includes white beans.

The soups come in comforting favorites, too, such as baked potato, tomato basil, butternut squash and broccoli cheddar. Don’t worry about indulging in a bowl — there is cauliflower in the baked potato, and carrots and celery in the tomato basil. Butternut squash features in the broccoli cheddar, and even though you would think butternut squash is the only vegetable in the butternut squash soup, it’s also packed with sweet potatoes and carrots.

Because everything Oprah touches turns to gold, these side dishes and soups are most likely going to be flying off the shelves when they hit stores in October of this year. A portion of the proceeds even go to charities fighting hunger, because duh, it’s Oprah!”

Please also check out our YouSayWHAT.info blog!

Banana Delivery in NYC: It’s Seriously Complicated

Bananas

The New York Times had a fascinating feature last Friday (August 4) detailing the complications in getting bananas from their US point of entry into stores and fruit stands around New York City. Some 20 million bananas – and that doesn’t count the growing number being processed by supermarket companies – weekly.

The facts, figures and curious asides in this article include the fact that bananas are slightly radioactive. There’s also an explanation of how the ‘slip on a banana peel’ story got started, and another about the day it rained bananas in Pittsburgh.

Then there was the lady who repeatedly slipped on banana peels in a 17-long string of slip-and-fall accidents between 1906 and 1910. Eventually, she was charged with grand larceny, growing out of an investigation of her unapeeling (sic) accidents.

The Times on November 27, 1910, reported Mrs. Anna H. Sturla was due the next day in court, but the result of her hearing there wasn’t included in last week’s banana story. (And a search of the NYT archives found no later mention of her.)

The story did note that, at some point in the probably-near future, New Yorkers – like people elsewhere – are going to have to get used to a new type of banana. The Cavendish, the most commonly variety exported from Ecuador and other banana-growing countries (few of them, in fact, ‘banana republics’), is subject to being attacked and eventually defeated by a new strain of the Panama Disease, a type of Fusarium Wilt, a fungal disease that kills the plants it invades.

Scientists are trying to find or clone – as the Cavendish is a clone – that can resist that disease. But as banana historian Dan Koeppel told The Times, the Cavendish, like the Gros Michel (Big Mike) before it, have commercial advantages because around the world they are genetically identical, but “when one gets sick, they all get sick.”

In Asia, they’re trying to breed a Panama disease-resistant Cavendish. But, Mr. Koppel said, “You can’t just breed in resistance. You might be breeding out other stuff, like flavor.”

Collectively, The Times article of last week and the links we’ve provided will pretty much guarantee you’ll never again look at bananas quite the same way!

Please check out Doug Harris’s other blog, YouSayWHAT.info.

What’s In A Name? Trouble, Where “Fructose” Is Concerned

fructose_artThe following information is not confirmed, as of June 5, 2017, on an FDA website. The information below was provided by a company that offers nutritional supplements. Take the advice with a grain of salt – but no more than that, because excess salt is as serious a problem as is too much sugar!

I’m just writing to tip you off that the FDA is currently allowing food manufacturers to rename high-fructose corn syrup on ingredient labels.
And the big food companies are THRILLED about this. After all, this toxic ingredient has taken a beating in the press lately for being so unhealthy.
In fact, it got to the point where having high-fructose corn syrup” on ingredient lists was hurting sales.
That’s why the powerful food industry pushed for a new name… and as usual, they got their way.
The new name is simply “fructose” or “fructose syrup.”
Now, if you’ve read my blog on sugar, you already know fructose is one of the most dangerous things for your body. It skyrockets your risk for diabetes, heart disease, and liver disease.
And yet… food manufacturers put it in nearly everything. After all, it’s sweet and addictive — and it makes you eat more of their food.
Most people don’t know this, though. They know high-fructose corn syrup is bad. And some even know sugar is bad, too. But they don’t know it’s all because of the fructose.
And this name change is tricking many people into thinking dangerous, body-damaging food is okay.
That’s why I want you to be on the lookout for your enemy’s new name on ingredient labels:
The new name for high-fructose corn syrup is simply “fructose” or “fructose syrup.”
Make sure to spread the word to your friends and family, too.

Yes, do that. And for your own good, become a serious label reader, particularly if you are diabetic or, like me, a chronic kidney disease (CKD) sufferer. If you are dietarily sensitive to salt, potassium or something else, get religious about controlling your intake. It’s not hard to do, if you’re careful.

 

Government to Study GMOs; Scientists Have Favorably Done So For Generations!

 

gmo-label

Not everyone is familiar with the term GMO – Genetically Modified Food. Even fewer have more than a vague idea what the term means. The FDA – the US Food and Drug Administration – wants to see that changed, and has budgeted $3 million to “fund a campaign to promote genetically modified organisms in food” and “tout ‘the environmental, nutritional, food safety, economic, and humanitarian impacts’ of biotech crops and their derivative food products,” The Washington Post reported recently.

The paper noted that a few weeks ago, “more than 50 agriculture and food industry groups” recently signed a letter “urging the funding to counter ‘a tremendous amount of misinformation and agricultural biotechnology in the public domain’.”

The paper added, “Some environmental groups and House Democrats have derided the provision as a government-sponsored public relations tool for the GMO industry,” and that “an attempt by Democrats to redirect the project’s funding to pediatric medical projects was unanimously voted down by Republicans.”

All this is, to paraphrase Shakespeare, “much ado about (practically) nothing.” The agricultural community has been genetically modifying seeds, and the composition of assorted plants, for generations – as long as such procedures as grafting have been known. Anyone who studied high school-level science should know that.

True, the sophistication of modifications has advanced in recent years as favorable qualities are bred in and not-so-nice ones are bred out. But opponents of GMO foods would have you believe that more harm than good has been done along the way. ‘T’ain’t true.

We benefit in a wide range of ways from genetic modification of our foodstuffs – far more than we truly benefit from some of “advances” in the art of food processing. (There is, more than likely, no legitimate nutritional value in extruded foods, yet they exist in abundance in our food stores.)

The GMO argument has become a political battleground – and that’s a shame. Because when politicians start throwing “facts” around. Keep in mind that Mark Twain said, “There are lies, damn lies, and statistics” – and it’s the latter, which can be misleading based on the sources you use, and don’t use, that politicians most love to employ in favor of their favorite arguments.

Think about the wonders of how genetically modifying foods benefits you when you next look at an apple display in your favorite food store (or another one!). All those varieties didn’t just come to be: Most of them were created, via genetic modification of one sort or another.

McDonald’s Pushes Produce In New Sandwich Range

mcDonald's Pushes Produce in New Sandiches

McDonald’s New Sandwiches

The fast food giant has beefed, er, greened up its menu – in select locations, so far – with a range of Signature Crafted ™ sandwiches. They feature avocado, lettuce, onions and tomatoes in various combination, the And Now You Know produce news website has reported.

According to a press release, the three new recipes, all of which are customizable by protein and bun, include the following:

Pico Guacamole

This combination of 100% Hass avocado guacamole, freshly prepared Pico de Gallo, crisp leaf lettuce, white cheddar cheese, and creamy buttermilk ranch sauce made with real buttermilk and sour cream blended with shallots, garlic, and spices will have your mouth watering. And for the extra produce-y spin on top, each sandwich is served with a fresh lime wedge.

Sweet BBQ Bacon:

Sweet BBQ meets savory, grilled onions, thick-cut Applewood smoked bacon, creamy white cheddar, and BBQ sauce, all topped with another helping of onions—this time golden and crispy.

Maple Bacon Dijon

Sweet and savory join together here again, with grilled onions, thick-cut Applewood smoked bacon with sweet maple seasoning, white cheddar, crisp leaf lettuce, and a creamy Dijon sauce.

While McDonald’s keeps specifics of their produce sourcing under wraps, the company points to a few different locales for this new sandwich line—mainly California, working with places like Salinas and Yuma for its lettuce and other items.

“We source all the lettuce for our sandwiches and salads from Salinas Valley in California during the summer, and Yuma, Arizona during the winter from farms.

Tiffany Briggs, McDonald’s Communications Supervisor told ANYN’s Melissa De Leon via email,”This is a national menu item available in our 14,000+ restaurants and wanted consumers to be aware of where our produce comes from. As a side note, McDonald’s restaurants receive produce 2-3 times each week.”

Cutting Produce Waste Gains Fans, At Farm and Store Levels

produce box

 

There is a growing movement to reduce wastage of pre-store and store-level waste of produce that is just past its prime.

Perhaps the leader in the pre-store sector of the movement is Imperfect Produce, which sources from farms and delivers to householders through the San Francisco Bay area and, increasingly, in and around Los Angeles. Whole Foods Market introduced a program a year ago to sell “cosmetically challenged” fruits and vegetables that, despite Iooking less than perfect, are as fit for the table, lunchbox or ingredients-prepping table as their better-looking counterparts. In March of this year, Maine-based Hannaford Brothers   joined the increasing number of retailers who are offering, at discounted prices, what Hannaford calls “The Misfits – Beautifully delicious and Nutritious” but slightly over-ripe or less-than-ideally-shaped produce items.

Now, Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health has come out with a detailed primer advising shoppers and would-be eaters ways to make it more likely they will waste less of produce they buy with the best of intentions – to prepare/eat it in a timely fashion – and then don’t do so.

Whole Foods and Hannaford, no doubt like others, pull ‘misfit” produce from their own stock. Imperfect works with an assortment of farms, many of them family operated, around California. They buy what’s in season but a little “off,” cosmetically.’

Their website says, “The produce we source is rejected purely for cosmetic reasons, meaning that taste and nutrition aren’t affected. Common reasons for produce being classified as “ugly” are: too small, wrong color, misshapen. We only source the most delicious fruits and vegetables, and we have strict quality-control measures in place to ensure that what ends up on your doorstep is fresh, delicious, and nutritious. If we wouldn’t eat it, we won’t sell it. We’re redefining BEAUTY in produce, not taste!” They also have a “like it or don’t pay for it” policy in the event a client feels something in their weekly box – the program works on a subscription basis, with boxes of pre-selected sizes and mixes being delivered weekly – is too ugly, they get credit for it in their next shipment.

It is likely more such programs will be initiated in coming years, and well they should be, Anything to reduce the amount of produce being wasted is a good thing!