Tag Archives: Sustainability

We’re In ‘World Meat-Free Week’

 

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People enjoying vegetarian/vegan entrees from around the world: Steamed sourdough dumplings filled with buckwheat groats. Fermented beetroot & wild herbs, with sweet & sour chili sauce. Carrot, savoy cabbage & chickpea coconut milk curry. Basmati rice pilav with cashew nuts. Photo: Greenpeace

Meat-eaters of the world: This isn’t your week.  It’s World Meat-Free Week!

The exclusion (or limiting) of meat from one’s diet is, in fact, a growing trend in the US, the UK, and, undoubtedly, elsewhere.

The reasons, as a recent article in The Guardian put it, “are obvious – meat-eating is cruel, environmentally ruinous (accounting for 15% of global greenhouse gas emissions) and often unhealthy, too – recent studies have found raw meat samples contain increasing amounts of plasticsantibiotics, and even fecal matter.”

All this, The Guardian said, “explains why Quorn is on course to become a billion-dollar business within a decade, and why this is World Meat-Free Week. (And June 11 was World Meat Free Day. Did you know, or participate?)

‘Fake Meat’ Is a Divisive Topic

Many meat-lovers – or carnivores, as my wife calls herself – look down their noses (but not to their mouths, or their health) when the topic of ‘fake meat’ arises. As USA Today put it recently, “It’s a divisive topic, and one that frequently pits vegans against carnivores – pretty needless given it’s just a way of increasing options for the dinner table. It’s not just for vegetarians but anyone wishing to reduce their meat intake given the colossal environmental crisis we find ourselves in.”

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Tesco’s meatless ‘steak’.  (Photo supplied)

How does the public feel about meat alternatives? The website PlantBasedNews.org recently noted that when Britain’s Tesco supermarket chain introduced vegan steaks recently, 40,000 were sold “within days.” Demand for the plant-based product has been “extremely high,” the website noted. Tesco is the world’s first supermarket company beyond Holland to sell this product from Vivera.

And Sainsbury’s, another British supermarket chain, announced earlier this month that it is introducing a range of faux meat items to be presented alongside the real thing in meat cabinets.

The “lookalike” burgers and minced meat making their UK debut in Sainsbury’s on June 27 are made by the Danish manufacturer Naturli’ Foods – a leading developer of plant-based foods since 1988. That company says it has struggled to keep up with demand since their January launch in Denmark.

Line Has “Underlying Meatiness”

The Naturli products are not designed to taste like beef, but have an underlying “meatiness” thanks to the umami flavor of almonds, tomatoes and porcini mushrooms. The burgers contain beets, which helps recreate the color of raw, medium and well-done meat as it cooks, as well as adding a realistic meat “juice” when bitten into.

“Our goal is to contribute to restore the balance between nature and man,” CEO Henrik Lundtold The Guardian. “We’ve developed this product assuming that many people want to eat plants instead of animals, but are afraid of compromising on flavor and maybe even missing out on their favorite dishes such as lasagna or burger patties.”

The range goes on sale after a major study claimed that avoiding meat and dairy products impact on the environment is unforgivably high.

Avoiding meat and dairy products is the single biggest way to reduce your environmental impact on the planet, according to the scientists behind the most comprehensive analysis to date of the damage farming does to the planet.

Cut Meat/Dairy Consumption, Reduce Farmland Use 83%

The new research shows that without meat and dairy consumption, global farmland use could be reduced by more than 75% – an area equivalent to the US, China, European Union and Australia combined – and still feed the world. Loss of wild areas to agriculture is the leading cause of the current mass extinction of wildlife.

The new analysis shows that while meat and dairy provide just 18% of calories and 37% of protein, it uses the vast majority – 83% – of farmland and produces 60% of agriculture’s greenhouse gas emissions. Other recent research shows 86% of all land mammals are now livestock or humans. The scientists also found that even the very lowest impact meat and dairy products still cause much more environmental harm than the least sustainable vegetable and cereal growing.

A 2006 report published by the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization noted that the livestock sector generates more greenhouse gas emissions as measured in CO2 equivalent – 18 percent – than transport. It is also a major source of land and water degradation.
Henning Steinfeld, Chief of FAO’s Livestock Information and Policy Branch and senior author of the report, said, “Livestock are one of the most significant contributors to today’s most serious environmental problems. Urgent action is required to remedy the situation.”
With increased prosperity, people are consuming more meat and dairy products every year. Global meat production is projected to more than double from 229 million tonnes (metric tons, each amounting to 2,205 pounds, or 1,000 kg) in 1999/2001 to 465 million tonnes in 2050, while milk output is set to climb from 580 to 1043 million tonnes.
A new report, reported on in The Guardian on May 30, 2018, declares that the global livestock sector is growing faster than any other agricultural sub-sector. It provides livelihoods to about 1.3 billion people and contributes about 40 percent to global agricultural output. For many poor farmers in developing countries livestock are also a source of renewable energy and an essential source of organic fertilizer for their crops.
But such rapid growth exacts a steep environmental price, according to the FAO report, Livestock’s Long Shadow –Environmental Issues and Options. “The environmental costs per unit of livestock production must be cut by one half, just to avoid the level of damage worsening beyond its present level,” it warns.
When emissions from land use and land use change are included, the livestock sector accounts for 9 percent of CO2 deriving from human-related activities, but produces a much larger share of even more harmful greenhouse gases. It generates 65 percent of human-related nitrous oxide, which has 296 times the Global Warming Potential (GWP) of CO2. Most of this comes from manure.
And it accounts for respectively 37 percent of all human-induced methane (23 times as warming as CO2), which is largely produced by the digestive system of ruminants, and 64 percent of ammonia, which contributes significantly to acid rain.
Livestock, this latest report says, now use 30 percent of the earth’s entire land surface, mostly permanent pasture but also including 33 percent of the global arable land used to producing feed for livestock, the report notes. As forests are cleared to create new pastures, it is a major driver of deforestation, especially in Latin America where, for example, some 70 percent of former forests in the Amazon have been turned over to grazing.

Given all that, the idea of plant-based ‘fake’ meat doesn’t sound like such a bad idea, does it?

US-based Beyond Meat has been incredibly successful with its line of plant-based meat alternatives. Its Beyond Burgers, Beyond  Sausage, Beyond Chicken Strips and other products are increasingly making inroads into both supermarkets and the likes of TGI Fridays. Helping their advance are such slogans as it “looks, cooks and satisfies like beef” (on the Beyond Burger) and “looks, sizzles and satisfies like pork” (on its Beyond Sausage trio of Brat Original, Hot Italian and Sweet Italian).

Watch this – meat case – space: This is, no doubt, the beginning of a revolution in that department.

 

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Preventing Food Waste Is Goal of Paris’s Freegan Restaurant

What can, by now, be called ‘a movement’ to reduce food waste – in one of the cleverest-possible ways, is what Paris’s Freegan Pony restaurant is all about. Chef Aladdin Charni feeds some 400 people daily on perfectly good food that, were it not for him, would have been discarded as ‘waste’ by merchants at Rungis, the world’s largest wholesale food market.

Why would all these vegetables – Freegan serves only vegetarian meals – be destined for destruction? Their ‘sell by’ dates had, or were on the verge of being, past.

What inspired Charni to establish his restaurant?

In order for us to prove the value and safety of food waste, we couldn’t just feed specific demographics of people. We believe food waste is absolutely fit for human consumption and so that’s who we feed – human beings,” Charni told CNN.

He explained that while he sources from numerous places – including food banks, restaurants, cafes, food photographers, evens, and functions – perhaps his greatest, and most reliable source is the Rungis market. Because the wholesalers there are selling to a spectrum of resellers as well as restaurants, they want their produce to leave the market at, or approaching, its freshness peak. When something – even a case of something – gives a merchant reason to suspect it’s past one of those points, they don’t try to sell it. They can’t: The French are particular about their food, and the Rungis merchants are particular about their reputations.

An increasing number of U.S. supermarket operators are making similar efforts to avoid seeing produce that may not be quite ‘fit for prime time’ be tossed into the dumpster. Instead, many are using perfectly healthy but just-past-prime foods in their in-house prepared food operations. In worst case scenarios, where something more than a few days beyond prime, it can form the basis for a soup – one already in the kitchen’s repertoire, or a new, innovative one.

Savings from not throwing perfectly good food out can be substantial. Of course it’s a lot easier to monitor the age of produce in a store than in one’s home, where things often are stuck into plastic containers are placed, in no logical way, on shelves. The volume of food ‘lost’ in this way amounts, amazingly, to more than 10% of what is bought for home use.

Consumers can save themselves a great deal of money if they create systems for refrigerator-storing of food. Both uncooked items and leftovers too often get overlooked until they are unsalvageable.

Its recent report on the Freegan Pony restaurant, on Paris’s outskirts, described how chef Aladdin Charni feeds some 400 people daily on perfectly good food that, were it not for him, would have been discarded as ‘waste’ by merchants at Rungis, the world’s largest wholesale food market.

Why would all these vegetables – Freegan serves only vegetarian meals – be destined for destruction? Their ‘sell by’ dates had, or were on the verge of being, past.

What inspired Charni to establish his restaurant?

In order for us to prove the value and safety of food waste, we couldn’t just feed specific demographics of people. We believe food waste is absolutely fit for human consumption and so that’s who we feed – human beings,” Charni told CNN.

He explained that while he sources from numerous places – including food banks, restaurants, cafes, food photographers, evens, and functions – perhaps his greatest, and most reliable source is the Rungis market. Because the wholesalers there are selling to a spectrum of resellers as well as restaurants, they want their produce to leave the market at, or approaching, its freshness peak. When something – even a case of something – gives a merchant reason to suspect it’s past one of those points, they don’t try to sell it. They can’t: The French are particular about their food, and the Rungis merchants are particular about their reputations.

An increasing number of U.S. supermarket operators are making similar efforts to avoid seeing produce that may not be quite ‘fit for prime time’ be tossed into the dumpster. Instead, many are using perfectly healthy but just-past-prime foods in their in-house prepared food operations. In worst case scenarios, where something more than a few days beyond prime, it can form the basis for a soup – one already in the kitchen’s repertoire, or a new, innovative one.

Savings from not throwing perfectly good food out can be substantial. Of course it’s a lot easier to monitor the age of produce in a store than in one’s home, where things often are stuck into plastic containers are placed, in no logical way, on shelves. The volume of food ‘lost’ in this way amounts, amazingly, to more than 10% of what is bought for home use.

Consumers can save themselves a great deal of money if they create systems for refrigerator-storing of food. Both uncooked items and leftovers too often get overlooked until they are unsalvageable.

PepsiCo Charts Healthier, More Environment-Friendly Path

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In one of the boldest, bravest and most extensive commitments a food industry company has made with the intent of “meeting changing consumer and societal needs,” PepsiCo announced Oct. 17 that a sizable share of its massive product range – marketed under a staggering assortment of brand names – will have their sugar, saturated fat and sodium content drastically reduced by the year 2025.

The Purchase, New York-based company simultaneously announced plans to reduce its environment impact and “to empower people around the world.”

The company

  • Plans to continue transforming its product portfolioby offering healthier food and beverage choices, reduce its environmental impact and empower people around the world
  • At leasttwo-thirds of PepsiCo beverages expected to contain 100 calories or fewer from added sugar per 12-oz serving by 2025,with increased focus on zero- and lower-calorie products
  • Targeting 15% improvement in water efficiency of itsdirect agricultural supply chain in high water-risk areas by 2025 – saving the equivalent of total water used in PepsiCo’s manufacturing operations
  • Seeking 20%reduction in greenhouse gas emissions across the company’s value chain, including its agricultural supply, by 2030
  • In partnership with PepsiCo Foundation, plans toinvest $100 million supporting initiatives to benefit at least 12.5 million women and girls around the world

A company press statement said, “These new initiatives continue PepsiCo’s decade-long commitment to delivering Performance with Purpose, a pioneering vision launched in 2006 rooted in the fundamental belief that business success is inextricably linked to the sustainability of the world we share.

“To succeed in today’s volatile and changing world, corporations must do three things exceedingly well: focus on delivering strong financial performance, do it in a way that is sustainable over time and be responsive to the needs of society,” said PepsiCo Chairman and CEO Indra Nooyi. “The first ten years of PepsiCo’s Performance with Purpose journey have demonstrated what is possible when a company does well by also doing good. We have created significant shareholder value, while taking important steps to address environmental, health and social priorities all around the world.”

“PepsiCo’s journey is far from complete, and our new goals are designed to build on our progress and broaden our efforts,” Nooyi continued. “We have mapped our plans against the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, and we believe the steps we are taking will help lift PepsiCo to even greater heights in the years ahead. Companies like PepsiCo have a tremendous opportunity – as well as a responsibility – to not only make a profit, but to do so in a way that makes a difference in the world.”

Oregon School Takes ‘Local-Only’ Food Campaign To Whole New Level

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Photo credit: KVAL-TV, Eugene Oregon

All the food – all of it – served in the Fairfield Elementary School in Eugene, Oregon’s Bethel district last Wednesday was locally grown and/or produced in their town’s pretty immediate area, it was reported by KVAL-TV.

“Every bite was produced in Oregon,” the station declared.

Farmers and representatives from companies like Franz Bakery came to the cafeteria to serve the food to kids.

Bethel nutrition director Jennie Kolpak says the special lunch was intended to introduce students to the idea of eating locally.

Kolpak says locally-produced food is better for Oregon’s economy, and healthier for kids.

But that idea isn’t unfamiliar to the Bethel District.

“Every day, every single meal that we serve has some local items in it,” says Kolpak. “About 40 percent of the food we serve is grown or processed in Oregon.”

Kolpak says Bethel is one of the best districts in the state in locally-produced, nutritious food.

Wednesday’s food came from all over the state, but a lot of Bethel’s food comes from much closer to home.

Fairfield boasts a school garden with tomatoes, peas and other plants.

And recently, a four-acre field on district property was turned into a functioning farm.

“We harvested thousands of pounds of vegetables this summer,” says Bethel Farm manager Kasey White. “And we’re supplying fresh food to our cafeterias.”

Going forward, a goal for the Bethel district is to expand access to nutritional and physical education to give kids healthy habits.

 

Down With Pork? How About Cutting Down on All Meat!

 

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Photograph: BSIP/UIG via Getty Images (and The Guardian)

Many years ago, France was so language proud that words from elsewhere were banned. Now, with le hot dog and various other ‘cross-over’ words being very much du jour, the battle for French ‘purity’ has moved to a new front: The school cafeteria.

Where for 30 or more years parents could choose an other-than-pork entrée for their children, some schools have removed that option, leaving Jewish children and, increasingly, Muslim ones, with no meat option at all when, say, roast pork, Strasbourg sausage or ham-pasta bake is on the menu.

When one parent queried at her small town’s administrative office why the change had been instituted, she was told, bluntly,  “From now on, that’s the way it is. Pork or nothing,” The Guardian reported late last year.

The issue, French officials say, is “secularity.” Parents of affected children, who often are themselves too young to understand why their families don’t eat pork, understandably view the matter as a form of discrimination – secularity be damned!

In at least two other jurisdictions – a portion of Germany, and around Houston, Texas – some schools are voluntarily opting to offer other-than-pork options.

An observer in Houston told us that, “Here, we also don’t use pork on a purely voluntary basis to accommodate religious needs. Some of our schools have significant Muslim populations.”

FoodTradeTrends.com was told by the German Embassy in Washington that, “In light of the current refugee situation, several public cafeterias and kindergartens in Germany decided voluntarily to stop or limit the serving of pork out of respect for Muslim migrants. In light of this, the CDU (Christian Democratic Union, a political party) in the state of Schleswig-Holstein submitted a proposal earlier this month to maintain the use of pork in school lunches.

“The disputed application was rejected on March 9th by all the other political parties within the Schleswig-Holstein state parliament. The consensus in the parliament is that each public cafeteria or kindergarten can decide on its own whether it wants to offer pork.

“The reduction of pork in school cafeterias is not based purely on a higher number of Muslim students, but rather on changes in nutrition standards and an overall goal to consume less meat.”

Several American organizations, the American Heart Association being prime among them, are strongly encouraging the consumption of less meat, overall, and less red meat, in particular, for health reasons. The AHA’s D.A.S.H. diet – D.A.S.H. stands for Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension – is widely recognized as being not just a good approach to dealing with and/or preventing hypertension (high blood pressure), it also is very effective for weight loss, lowering cholesterol, and managing or preventing diabetes, U.S. News & World Report said earlier this year, when naming D.A.S.H. “the best diet” for the sixth year in a row.

There are at least two other reasons why eating less meat is a good idea. One, a major part of the mission of The Reducetarian Foundation, is to spare farm animals from cruelty. There’s also the fact that, as SustainableTable.org points out, “The United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) estimates the meat industry generates nearly one-fifth of the man-made greenhouse gas emissions that are accelerating climate change worldwide. Far more than transportation. And annual worldwide demand for meat continues to grow. Reining in meat consumption one a week can help slow this trend.

Essentially making that same argument is the “Take Extinction Off Your Plate” initiative of the Center for Biological Diversity. Its website says, “Wild animals suffer not only the collateral damage of meat-related deforestation, drought, pollution and climate change, but also direct targeting by the meat industry.”

As a long-age advertising campaign said relative to Levy’s Jewish Rye Bread, “You don’t have to be Jewish…” or Muslim, or vegetarian … to favor pork- and even meat-free diet options!