Tag Archives: Wegmans

Wegmans Feeds 1,000 C’ville Protests First Responders

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Wegmans on Dick Rd. in Cheektowaga. Photo taken, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. (Sharon Cantillon/Buffalo News)

More than 1.000 first responders dealing with the unrest in Charlottesville VA last weekend faced angry protesters – some there to oppose the city’s plan to remove from a public part a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee from a public park, others out to protesters that group – from Friday night through Sunday. Thanks to Wegman’s, the New York State-based supermarket chain presently expanding into states far further south, they didn’t do so on empty stomachs.

A car of the first responders visited a Wegman’s a couple of miles from the heart of the protest area, abutting the campus of the University of Virginia, seeking a couple of pizzas and some drinks. They got way more, when store managers and workers set aside normal tasks to go all out preparing and packing hot food, beverages and more for the first responders – and initially refused to take any money for it. (Then, the first responders said they insisted on paying, and the store reluctantly gave in.)

A Facebook posting by Metro Richmond Fire Incidents, which sent crews to Charlottesville for the event, said that “store managers halted their daily work and ‘dedicated themselves and other staff to cooking for us. They fired up all their ovens, called in extra bakers and even emptied their freezers to cook boxed pizza for us when they ran out of dough.”
The night manager stayed till 1 a.m. to oversee the effort to feed more than 1,000 police officers and National Guard members, “amid absolute chaos and with no advanced notice,” according to the Facebook post. The deed culminated Sunday morning with 500 Virginia State Police troopers “walking into their location, bereft with grief, yet so thankful to see a 20-foot long counter lined with breakfast.”

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Jo Natale, a spokesperson for Wegmans, confirmed the actions of employees confirmed the actions of employees and declined to comment further to Wegman’s hometown newspaper, the Rochester Democrat a& Chronicle, stating that the Facebook post “speaks for itself.”

Since it was initially put online, the post by the Metro Richmond Fire Incidents page was shared more than 4,000 times with more than 4,300 reactions and 300+ comments, it was reported by WHAM-TV of Rochester NY.

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Gambling Machines Among Latest ‘Added Values’ Items In US Supermarkets

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Generally speaking, grocers aren’t gamblers: Traditionally, they’ve tended to hew to fairly traditional approaches to marketing and selling food. At least they did until a few years ago.

Then, faced with new competitor types – such as hard discounters such as Aldi and Sav-A-Lot (and now, Lidl) – and an increasing emphasis on store periphery departments, retailers started stepping up their game, expanding their offerings and, most recently, paring prices to the bone.

A growing number, including New York State-based Wegman’s, and Connecticut-based Stew Leonard’s, added an entertainment factor by bringing ‘backroom’ business to the store floor: Putting in-store baking operations front-and-center; providing a window into juice- and milk-bottling operations (Stew Leonard was a pioneer in this); taking sampling to a new level with educated offerings of featured wines … the list goes on.

But following at least two other Illinois grocers in truly breaking new ground recently was a Piggly Wiggly store in Antioch, where several video gambling machines were introduced. Store owner David Karczewski told the local Daily Herald newspaper that while the machines hadn’t been part of his original plan when he applied for a license to sell alcohol within his store, he quickly realized that the liquor permit, which also allowed him to introduce video gambling into his grocery store, sounded like a good idea.

He’s subsequently said he’s been proved right: He told the Daily Herald that they’ve earned him a number of new customers.

Hardly surprisingly, some community members have objected to the presence of gambling machines in a family-focused establishment, while town board members say allowing gambling wasn’t their intention in approving the store’s liquor license. Store owner Karczewski, meanwhile, said he installed the machines to give his location a competitive edge against larger competitors, and he’s been pleased with the many new shoppers he’s seen in the store.

His innovation, Food Dive noted a few days ago, isn’t all that different from other food retailers’ innovative efforts to attract new customers, or, at the least, new income from existing ones. (Banking, parcel shipping, Coinstar machines and even the occasional Department of Motor Vehicles branch as well as restaurants and bars being among them.)

In all such instances, retailers are fighting as best they can to overcome competitive threats. Even more extreme, though, are the approaches of such disrupters as Lidl and Aldi, in particular, whose strategies revolve around limiting selections (reducing the need for backroom space) and cutting costs – internally and to consumers – to the bone.

The latter’s strategy is disrupting the food retailing industry more dramatically than anything before it came close to doing. The club stores – Costo, Sam’s Club – caused a lot of shoppers to rethink shopping patterns a couple decades ago, but the careful among them quickly realized that the key to successfully shopping those stores – to save money – is to ‘pre-shop’ prices of things you want at other outlets. The clubs aren’t giving anything away, so some of their prices are far from the best out there.

And that concept was further complicated as Amazon introduced an ever-broader range of products online. Now, the click-and-collect concept that Walmart, among others, are greatly promoting are presenting further challenges to walk-in-and-buy oriented retailers.

It’s only a matter of time before Walmart and others figure out how to profitably do click-and-collect on food items. Fresh and frozen food items, that is: Offering click-and-collect on dry groceries is as simple as doing it.

Meanwhile, dollar stores also are becoming more competitive against grocers. Dollar Tree, for example, has been featuring – via a big store-front banner – a several-ounce ‘pre-conditioned’ steak for around $4.00. But this is a real ‘buyer beware’ item: The product looks good, but the ‘pre-conditioning’ has involved a form of pounding that’s beat the … flavor out of the product.

Still, to some shoppers, something called a ‘steak’ is still outside the range of what they usually consume for protein. And that’s the key issue on all the retail changes the industry is undergoing: The value is in the eyes of the beholders, and consumers, having an amazing assortment of tastes and concepts of what’s good, and good for them, will respond to grocers’ changes with their own ideas of what makes sense and what doesn’t.

Watch this space!

Supermarkets Are Replacing Department Stores in US Malls

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As department store chains shrink, their former stores in malls have remained empty, making mall operators unhappy and customers wary of all the dark anchor spaces – those at either end of the mall, once the hustling, bustling home to this Big Name Chain or another one. What’s a mall operator to do?

Increasingly, a Philadelphia Inquirer article noted last week (April 11), supermarkets are increasingly being invited – or independently exploring opportunities – to take over spaces once occupied by J.C. Penney, Sears, Macy’s or another once-popular, now-fading national or regional department store outlet.

The malls offer several serious pluses to food sellers: [1] They have the right zoning; [2] they were designed for high traffic, and have parking lots to accommodate it, and [3] they tend to be in easy-to-get-to/from locations. (A notable exception to the latter is Virginia’s Tysons Corner area, just outside Washington, D.C. When I lived in that area 40 years ago, after a few harried visits, I wouldn’t go near the “place” – actually an accumulation of shopping centers positioned so close to each other that getting from one to another was a nightmare and avoiding the entire mess was all but impossible.

(The Tysons Center website lists more than 300 stores, including an Amazon kiosk. And that’s in just one of the shopping centers!)

In the Philadelphia area, a Whole Foods already has replaced a department store at Plymouth Meeting Mall. Another Whole Foods is due to open later in the year at Exton Square Mall, and a Wegman’s is in the works for the Montgomery Mall. The article also noted that “Jimbo’s, a specialty food chain much like Whole Foods, opened at Westfield Horton Plaza in San Diego; Wegmans is replacing a Penneys near Boston; and College Mall in Bloomington, Ind., will welcome 365 by Whole Foods Market this fall.”

Expect to see more such activity in coming months and years.

Food prices down? Fine, for now; But they’re market-driven, and winter’s coming

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Supermarkets across the U.S. continue reacting to deflationary market pressures by lowering prices on both commodities and packaged goods. Sometimes one chain or another – think of Walmart – doesn’t do reductions and price fluctuations as smoothly as they could, though.

Walmart, like a lot of major food retailers – it is, after all, America’s largest supermarket company – has been promoting store-wide ‘permanent’ roll-backs in prices for most or all of 2016. What they haven’t been talking about, with good reason, is the fact that the kinds and levels of price changes they institute will hardly negatively affect the company’s bottom line.

Example: Way earlier this year, a 20-oz. (567 g) loaf of their Great Value white bread could be had for $.88. Then, a couple of months later, the price was quietly upped to $.99. It’s since been upped again, to a bit more than one dollar.

(At one point in the late spring, the company seemed to have actually killed that bread brand, as shelves were devoid of it for a couple of weeks or more where I shop, in Central Virginia. But that could have been just another far-too-typical out-of-stock situation – a problem Walmart seemed to be struggling with a lot until recently, when they’ve actually brought back a few brands first appearing to be out-of-stock then totally disappearing.)

Example II: Generic large egg prices fell to an amazing $.88 a dozen in the early summer – in part due to an oversupply situation in the industry. That price held, at ‘my’ Walmart, for close to a month. Then, in an amazingly stupid more, the price was pushed up to $.99 behind promotional signs touting a ‘new low price’! Yep, they still were cheaper than the dollar-plus per dozen price at Food Lion, the only other chain retailer readily available to me. But how dumb do you think your customers are when you tout a higher price as a new ‘low’ one?

(Meanwhile, as consumer demand for ‘cage free’ eggs and chicken has grown, prices at that end of the hen fruit market have moved, and stayed, higher. But As this blog reported on Oct. 21, ‘Cage Free is Far From Trouble Free’, and this is an issue the chicken and egg industry is going to have to deal with.)

Rochester NY-based Wegmans announced a few days ago that it is cutting a bunch of prices across the store, with produce being among the most-positively-affected sections. Other supermarketers across the country have done the same or similar in recent months.

But consumers need to keep one thing in mind: In the 1980’s, a supermarket company named Grand Union – a venerable company with a colorful past – it was probably the first, and one of the few, supermarket operators to employ customer helpers who traversed a then-considered-huge 100,000 sq ft store in central New York state on roller skates – made a series of serious mistakes. One of them, the first or second in a sad series, was to declare that a round of price reductions it was introducing were ‘forever’. If you’re a believer, you may argue that God knows ‘forever’; whether you’re a believer or not, the smallest bit of common sense dictates that no supermarket company can afford to make promises like that.

Long story shortened: A year or so after one of its executives suffered what clearly appeared to be a ‘mob hit’ – his body was never found – this New Jersey-based company went bankrupt.

The ‘forever’ issue was only a symptom, as it turned out: The real cause of the company’s come-down/put-down was a succession of management companies’ desire to fatten their purses at the expense of the golden swan – the layer of the golden eggs.

As a shopper, you can count one thing, and only one thing, where supermarket prices are concerned: They are, and will continue to be, market-driven, both up and down.

While some of your best buys will always be found in your favorite store’s weekly flyer, the very best ones will always be found in your meat department, where items too close to a sell-buy date are marked down – sometimes way down.

But a word of caution: If you seek out that kind of savings, pay close attention to the ‘use or freeze by’ dates. While they are generally generous, in terms of absolute safety, don’t push your luck: Use, or freeze. (Or cook and freeze; The benefit is the roughly the same.)